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Friday, November 15, 2019
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

New York Times Says Americans can still travel to Cuba



Washington,  October 1 - US citizens can still visit Cuba under the category of 'support for the Cuban people', either independently or on an accompanying tour, The New York Times said yesterday.

In an article entitled 'Seven things you should know about going to Cuba now', the newspaper recalled the Trump administration, as part of Washington's blockade against the island, announced in June new rules for Americans traveling to the Caribbean country.

Such measures include the prohibition of cruises to the greater of the Antilles and the elimination of one of the 12 categories under which the neighboring territory was allowed to visit: that of educational and cultural trips known as 'people to people', said the NYT.

Despite the new restrictions, the Times remarked it is still possible to go to Cuba through the aforementioned category of support to the people, which requires Americans spend money on businesses owned by Cubans during their trip, something they will surely do, even without trying.

Along with this information, the text tells American readers about other topics that may be useful in the preparation of a trip to the greater of the Antilles, such as the fact that through a simple process they can obtain at the airport the tourist card needed to enter the island, equivalent to a visa.

As part of the many steps to reverse the approach initiated between Cuba and the United States during the administration of Barack Obama (2009-2017), the Trump executive published in November 2017 a list of entities and sub-entities banned for Americans, which has been extended several times since then.

That is why the publication warned there are hotels on the island in which North Americans cannot stay, 'but Cuba has a thriving Airbnb industry (online company dedicated to the offer housing accommodation), in which the money goes to local owners, which is allowed'.

The Times offered information on other matters such as the exchange rate, the monetary duality of the Antillean nation and the fact that air tickets of US airlines flying to Cuba include a fee paid for health insurance during the stay.

Numerous voices in the United States denounce as a violation of the right of Americans to freely travel, the rules imposed against visits to the Caribbean country, where citizens of this nation can only go under the aforementioned categories, and not as tourists.

After the additional June restrictions, bipartisan bills were introduced in the House of Representatives and the Senate with the aim of eliminating those restrictions.